Is a Sign Company an Advertising Service?

Of course it is, state the authors. But as happened in a recent South Dakota case, the question can only be answered by constructing a carefully worded argument. BY B. JAMES CLAUS AND KAREN CLAUS THE QUESTION OF whether a sign company is an advertising service was addressed in a recent South Dakota case[1] involving […]

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USSC Study Earns Variances

Practical application of USSC’s Penn State study helped Mercer Signs obtain variances Three and a half years ago, the United States Sign Council (USSC) embarked on an ambitious study with the Penn State Transportation Institute. Signs of different colors, sizes and illuminations were arranged around an oval track. Drivers then reported their ability to read […]

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sign news

http://www.wyomingnews.com/news/local_news/new-directional-signs-installed-in-cheyenne/article_78134eae-6d08-11e7-b52f-af73f015b41c.html http://www.dailyfreeman.com/general-news/20170722/saugerties-schedules-hearings-on-plan-to-regulate-electronic-signs http://www.newsradio1067.com/2017/07/21/grassroots-group-fights-political-signs-on-public-property/ http://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/transportation/why-do-electronic-traffic-signs-sometimes-show-wrong-info-heres-why-and-what-might-fix-it/

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National Academies Releases Nighttime Overhead Signage Luminance Levels

The National Academies Press has issued an 80-page report entitled “Guidelines for Nighttime Overhead Sign Visibility.” It includes a chart that’s headlined “Luminance Levels for Overhead Signs.” It lists five different visual complexity levels, ranging from a dark rural area to a commercial downtown district. It then suggests minimum luminance levels in terms of candelas per square […]

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Texas/Pennsylvania DOT Studies Says Clearview Font Improves Sign Legibility

A study conducted jointly by the Texas and Pennsylvania Departments of Transportation concluded that the Clearview font increased the visibility distance for drives by 12% versus the existing Series E Modified font. In 1994 the Federal Highway Administration determined that highway signs were no longer visible enough for a population that included older drivers. Over […]

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Should Signs be Regulated as Lighting Devices?

The answer is a very clear “no.” An article in Signs of the Times magazine explains that electric signs are not lighting devices, per se. Their purpose is not to provide light, but to provide messages. Thus, they should not be regulated as lighting devices. Electric signs need to be bright enough to be legible, […]

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What has the Federal Highway Administration said about Off-premise Electronic Message Centers?

The 1965 Highway Beautification Act established federal guidelines for off-premise signs (billboards) located within 660 feet of federal highways. When “changeable Electronic Variable Message Signs (CEVMS),” (typically called electronic message centers, or EMCs, in the sign industry), began to become more commonplace, individual states began to establish agreement (Federal/State Agreements — FSAs) with the Federal Highway […]

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How is the Size of Signs Measured?

The most common restriction in sign codes concerns the size of signs. This includes such considerations as the “setback,” (distance away from the road), the height and the dimensions of the sign itself. When the sign is a rectangle, and the copy fills it,  it’s easy — height x width. A 4 x 6-foot sign […]

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What Types of Signs are Most Commonly Used?

One of the most significant ways to divide the sign industry is into “electric” signs (which have internal illumination) and “commercial” signs, which are non-illuminated. For approximately three decades, a trade journal for the sign industry, Signs of the Times, conducted surveys of sign companies as to how their businesses were faring. These were called […]

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What Types of Lighting are used to Internally Illuminate Signs?

The three primary types have been fluorescent, neon and LEDs for at least two decades, but the ratio of each has drastically changed. An industry trade journal, Signs of the Times, has traditionally tracked these changes through industry surveys. Its most recent such survey was published in its March 2015 edition. It notes that in […]

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